programming4us
programming4us
MOBILE

Consumerization Strategies (Part 1)

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire

Open vs. limited access

The mobile device market continues to evolve and consumers have access to more powerful technology than ever before. Bob Hafner, managing vice president with Gartner (www.gartner.com), remembers a time when “sophisticated” technology was “relatively expensive and generally not affordable for the individual.” Then, people started buying home PCs, even though they were less powerful than those they had at the office. However, that’s not the case anymore. Consumers have more information to draw from and feel more comfortable making technology decisions.

Consumerization is “about the consumer deciding what they want in a device,”

Consumerization is “about the consumer deciding what they want in a device,”

When the moment came that smartphones went past targeting business-people and widened their focus to the general public, consumerization was born. Consumerization is “about the consumer deciding what they want in a device,” says Hafner. And to help companies embrace consumerization, they started creating BYOD (bring your own device) policies, which “allow these devices in the workplace and give employees what they want, while [companies] still have some modicum of control,” he says.

Employees simply want more control over the devices they use in the workplace. But for many IT workers and administrators, the influx of consumer devices could be viewed as a threat to their role in the organization. The key to fully embracing consumerization and implementing successful BYOD policies is to understand what your employees want and find ways to fulfill those needs without making the organization vulnerable.

Prepare for a major culture change

Consumerization, which in its most basic sense can be described as an educational renaissance in how consumers view technology, flies in the face of traditional logic from an IT administrator point of view. According to Paul DeBeasi, research vice president with Gartner, employees are starting to believe that “they know what’s best for their job,” whereas this used to be the role of the IT department. But instead of seeking advice from IT experts, many consumers are forgoing a personal life and business life separation in favor of blending the two together with mobile devices.

Employees are starting to believe that “they know what’s best for their job,”

Employees are starting to believe that “they know what’s best for their job,”

“The first thing to overcome is the cultural shock of employees telling IT what to do,” says DeBeasi. “That’s an obstacle for many enterprises because for as long as personal computing has been around, it has been the IT department for the most part being the experts, being the most knowledgeable, making the rules, buying the equipment, deploying it, and supporting it. That’s been their role in life, and for some of these IT staff people it has been for decades. Now, that has been completely turned upside down, so there’s sort of a cultural mindset that must be overcome, and I wouldn’t underestimate that.”

The role of the IT administrator and of the IT department as a whole is starting to shift away from total control to more of a support role within the organization. “IT people are entrusted with ensuring corporate information is not lost out in the public domain and that there are no viruses or malware that get into the corporate environment that can cause security issues,” says Hafner. And now that well-established responsibility must apply to personal devices, to varying degrees.

Determine the level of support

BYOD is becoming a way of life, so it’s not a matter of whether or not you’ll support consumerization and the influx of employee-owned devices, it’s a matter of how much support you’ll provide. DeBeasi says is starts with something as simple as determining whether or not employees should be able to contact the help desk for personal device support, but it doesn’t stop there. Executives and IT administrators need to work together to decide what types of hardware, operating systems, and applications should be allowed. You have to ask yourself whether you want to include support for only enterprise apps or if you want to extend that support to personal apps.

BYOD is becoming a way of life

BYOD is becoming a way of life

It used to be that email was one of the only true business uses for mobile devices in the workplace, but that has changed significantly thanks to the proliferation of productivity apps and the increased performance of mobile networks. Employees can now use sales apps with access to sensitive information, says Hafner. This is information that you “don’t really want to get out to the public domain,” he says. So, de-pending on the applications that you choose to support, you’ll need security and management solutions in place to mitigate any risks.

You may already have what you need

If a majority of your employees or multiple departments in your organization only use business email on their personal devices, then you may already have sufficient tools in place that you weren’t previously aware of. “At the very minimum, you have to use Exchange ActiveSync, which allows you to enforce several policies on the device, so [you can] remotely wipe the device if it’s lost or stolen,” says Hafner. ActiveSync also provides password enforcement and other security features to help you get more control over your employee’s devices in the workplace. And perhaps the best thing about ActiveSync is that it is already built into Microsoft Exchange and is free to use.

At the very minimum, you have to use Exchange ActiveSync, which allows you to enforce several policies on the device

At the very minimum, you have to use Exchange ActiveSync, which allows you to enforce several policies on the device

Hafner says that ActiveSync is “great for email, and if you’re only allowing users to access email, then perhaps that’s good enough for you right now.” The only problem with ActiveSync is that it really only works for email, and most employees are going far beyond email in terms of how they use their devices for business. Hafner says that email is very well-understood and taken care of for the most part, but it’s with other applications that companies need to consider the level of security they need to fully protect devices and data.

Other  
 
Youtube channel
Top 10
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
REVIEW
- First look: Apple Watch

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 1)

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 2)
programming4us programming4us
programming4us
 
 
programming4us