programming4us
programming4us
DESKTOP

Tricky Art Of Finding Parts For Retro Computers (Part 1)

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire

Why is it that certain computer still evoke a satisfyingly warm response from computer enthusiasts the world over? Just one mention of the letters ZX or QL will have many a grown man weeping into his mouse with delight over fond memories of playing around with a box of, by modern standards, relatively uncomplicated bits and bobs.

 
Classic computing seems like it’s found its niche and will always be a part of the technology industry.

Classic computing seems like it’s found its niche and will always be a part of the technology industry.

Whether it’s gaming pleasures with the likes of Manic Miner and Horace Goes Skiing, or reliving memories of taking that first step into programming and gaining a greater knowledge of these once-futuristic machines, classic computing seems like it’s found its niche and will always be a part of the technology industry. The fact is that modern consumers seem increasingly interested in these bygone eras, with the word ‘retro’ becoming a label of genuine marketing power.

 
In short, where do you go to find dare parts for your retro computer builds and indeed entire retro computers, generally?

In short, where do you go to find dare parts for your retro computer builds and indeed entire retro computers, generally?

The scene surrounding retro computing is, of course, a well-established one and we have long championed those among us who can be found roaming around their garages or lofts, stacking away yet another piece of classic kit for use on another day. One of the more pressing problems surrounding the preservation of elderly kit is the thorny issue of what to do when a keyboard breaks, or a socket no longer works. In short, where do you go to find dare parts for your retro computer builds and indeed entire retro computers, generally?

Like the friendly computer article- writing imps that we are. We’ve been speaking to some of the people in the trade who offer to help with just this very issue. Here’s what they had to say.

Computer Fairs and meets

As is often the case when dealing with enthusiast pursuits, among the very best places to start when trilling to get hold of parts are people just like you. The chances are that in our locale, or certainly within driving distance, there will be a chap or chapess with a similar mindset to your good self who will have collected his or her own share of retro machines over the years and it’s just possible that they might have something you’re after.

If the idea of finding these people for yourself and heading directly to their home doesn’t exactly appeal, why not take advantage of the resources at your disposal which have done all the hard work for you?

Taking my own fair Leicestershire as an example, the Retro Computer Museum (www.retrocomputermuseum.co.uk) is, as you’d no doubt expect, a tribute to all that is classic in computing. Describing itself as a registered charity “dedicated to the benefit of the public for the preservation, display and public experience of computer and console systems from the 1960s onwards”, the museum concentrates on home computers from the early Pong consoles, through to the likes of Sega, Nintendo and, of course, the Spectrum, Amiga and Commodore systems.

 
Taking my own fair Leicestershire as an example, the Retro Computer Museum is, as you’d no doubt expect, a tribute to all that is classic in computing.

Taking my own fair Leicestershire as an example, the Retro Computer Museum is, as you’d no doubt expect, a tribute to all that is classic in computing.

As well as establishing its own tribute to these mighty machines of the past, the museum actively encourages others to feed their own retro obsessions by holding events throughout the year. Donations to the museum are a key part of any such events, but trading also plays a massive role.

The museum’s chairman, Andy Spencer, told me that the organization holds “two to three large events per year, something we’ve done for the past five years in fact,” and that “at these events, we have traders that deal in second hand retro kit and suppliers of ‘spares’ too.”

The museum has also recently moved to new premises allowing it to open on weekends. “AT the new premises we hold quite a few spares of our own, which we are willing to share for a small donation to the museum,” Andy added. “We also have a fully fitted out workshop where can repair our own, and other people’s, machines.”

 
Northern Computer Markets (www.computermarkets.co.uk) have been established since 1992, taking place every Saturday and Sunday and even on some weekday evenings

Northern Computer Markets (www.computermarkets.co.uk) have been established since 1992, taking place every Saturday and Sunday and even on some weekday evenings

Outside of Leicestershire, computer fairs can be found up and down the country, allowing traders to get out of the office and place parts into the hands of willing buyers. Northern Computer Markets (www.computermarkets.co.uk) have been established since 1992, taking place every Saturday and Sunday and even on some weekday evenings. Giving traders the chance to sell parts to a wide-ranging and eager public, these large-scale events require a fair amount of trawling on the part of the buyer – but, because of the amount of sellers on display, the chances of finding something of interest/use aren’t bad. It is fair, however, to say that you need the stomach for a long day.

Also, you should hone those negotiating skills before you turn up, as there is typically a chance to bargain with traders. It’s also true that many parts simple wont’ be found at these sort of more populist events, although finding whole systems might be more possible. For the rarer items, then a bit of specialist help may be required.

Other  
 
Top 10
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
REVIEW
- First look: Apple Watch

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 1)

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 2)
programming4us programming4us
Celebrity Style, Fashion Trends, Beauty and Makeup Tips.
programming4us
 
 
programming4us