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SECURITY

Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 : Components of a Secure Messaging Environment (part 5) - Using Email Disclaimers

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Using Email Disclaimers

Email disclaimers are notices that are automatically appended to outgoing messages. These disclaimers are primarily intended to reduce liability, and to caution recipients not to misuse the information contained within. The following is a sample email disclaimer:

The information contained in this message is intended solely for the individual to whom it is specifically and originally addressed. This message and its contents may contain confidential or privileged information. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure or distribution, or taking any action in reliance on the contents of this information, is strictly prohibited.

When implementing an email disclaimer, you should seek the review and approval of the disclaimer by the organization’s legal department, if any.

Creating an Email Disclaimer in Exchange Server 2007

Email disclaimers are easily configured in the Exchange Management Console by performing the following actions:

1.
Open the Exchange Management Console on the Hub Transport server.

2.
In the console tree, click Organization Configuration, and then click Hub Transport.

3.
In the results pane, click the Transport Rules tab, and then, in the action pane, click New Transport Rule.

4.
In the Name field, enter the name of the disclaimer. If you have notes for this disclaimer, enter them in the Comments field.

5.
If you want the disclaimer to be created in a disabled state, clear the Enabled check box. Otherwise, leave the Enabled check box selected. Click Next to continue.

6.
In the Step 1. Select the Condition(s) dialog box, select all the conditions that you want to be applied to this disclaimer. If you want this disclaimer to be applied to all email messages, do not select any conditions in this step. However, if you want the disclaimer to only be applied to outgoing messages, select Sent to Users Inside or Outside the Corporation.

7.
If you selected conditions in the previous step, in the Step 2. Edit the Rule Description (Click an Underlined Value) option, click each blue underlined word.

8.
When you click a blue underlined word, a new window opens to prompt you for the values to apply to the condition. Select the values that you want to apply, or type the values manually. If the window requires that you manually add values to a list, type a value. Then click Add. Repeat this process until you have entered all the values, and then click OK to close the window.

9.
Repeat the previous step for each condition that you selected. After you configure all the conditions, click Next.

10.
In the Step 1. Select the Action(s) dialog box, click Append Disclaimer Text Using Font, Size, Color, and Fallback to Action if Unable to Apply.

11.
In the Step 2. Edit the Rule Description (Click an Underlined Value) option, click each blue underlined word. Each word, except Disclaimer Text, is the default value for each field. The fields are Append (or Prepend), Disclaimer Text, Font, Font Size, Font Color, and Fallback Action. Click Disclaimer Text and enter the text of your disclaimer.

12.
When you click a blue underlined word, a new window opens to prompt you to select the items that you want to add or type values manually. When you are finished, click OK to close the window.

13.
Repeat the previous step for each action that you selected. After you configure all the actions, click Next.

14.
In the Step 1. Select the Exception(s) dialog box, select all the exceptions that you want to be applied to this rule. You are not required to select any exceptions.

15.
If you selected exceptions in the previous step, in the Step 2. Edit the Rule Description (Click an Underlined Value) option, click each blue underlined word.

16.
After you configure any exceptions, click Next.

17.
Review the Configuration Summary. If you are happy with the configuration of the new rule, click New. The rule is tested and, if there are no errors, the Completion screen shows 1 item, 1 succeeded, 0 failed. Click Finish.

Standardizing Server Builds

One other easily overlooked component of a secure messaging environment is ensuring that all components are maintained regularly and consistently. Maintaining server builds that are as identical as possible allows an organization to save on administration, maintenance, and troubleshooting.

With standardized systems, all servers can be maintained, patched, and upgraded in similar or identical manners.

Understandably, most organizations cannot afford to standardize on a single hardware platform and replace all of their systems with each and every upgrade. Often, as servers are added to and removed from an environment, different hardware platforms require different server builds to function properly. However, keeping these systems as close as possible in configuration by using automated and/or scripted installations, automated update utilities, and regular monitoring can increase the likelihood that each server added to the environment meets the organization’s security requirements.

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