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Samsung Galaxy S4 Review (Part 7)

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Performance and battery life

In general, the premium phones gas newest and coolest accessories at release. As you may guess, Galaxy S 4 continues that traditions, as proved by daily performance and the synthetic test. This special smartphone has 2 outstanding versions: one uses 1.9GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 chipset and another uses 8-core Exynos 5 chip of Samsung running at 1.6GHz, the latter takes 4 Cortex-A15 processors and combines them with 4 A7 processors. Despite the fact that Exynos provides LTE compatibility at all 20 frequencies, the American carriers all follows the Snapdragon model.

Performance and battery life

Performance and battery life

As a result, our conclusions about the performance of the phone are based on the tests with Snapdragon 600, which is combined with Adreno 320 GPU and 2GB RAM. This is the similar chip that HTC One and LG Optimus G Pro uses, though GS4 run at faster speed than the both. CPU uses Krait 300 – an enhancement from Krait 200 of S4 Pro, which leads to the 15% improvement in IPC and “speed-enhanced” Adreno 320 GPU. 600 is also built by using the 28nm process, which is similar to S4 Pro, and provides the 802.11ac support (apart from the standard a/b/g/n). how does it compare to One, and which kind of improvement does GS4 have compared to GS3? The following table answers such questions, so let’s take a look at it.

Samsung Galaxy S 4

·         Quadrant 2.0: 12,684

·         Vellamo 2.0: 1,903

·         AnTuTu 3.x: 26,143

·         SunSpider 0.9.1 (ms): 772

·         GLBenchmark Egypt 2.5 HD Offscreen (fps): 39

·         CF-Bench: 28,111

HTC One

·         Quadrant 2.0: 12,495

·         Vellamo 2.0: 2,429

·         AnTuTu 3.x: 25,140

·         SunSpider 0.9.1 (ms): 991

·         GLBenchmark Egypt 2.5 HD Offscreen (fps): 34

·         CF-Bench: 25,140

Samsung Galaxy S III

·         Quadrant 2.0: 5,875

·         Vellamo 2.0: 1,626

·         AnTuTu 3.x: 10,944

·         SunSpider 0.9.1 (ms): 1,194

·         GLBenchmark Egypt 2.5 HD Offscreen (fps): 15

·         CF-Bench: 12,922

Though it has just been a year since Galaxy S III released, the smartphone industry has become a boastful receiver of some “gigantic” improvements in processing power – and it’s not only that. The power that used to rule of Snapdragon chipset is now concealing by Snapdragon 600, and we fell that the history will repeat at the end of this year when 800 is released. Think about it from 6 tests above, GS4 has set up a record in 5, with One (the prior record breaker) not staying too far behind it.

Though it has just been a year since Galaxy S III released, the smartphone industry has become a boastful receiver of some “gigantic” improvements in processing power – and it’s not only that.

Though it has just been a year since Galaxy S III released, the smartphone industry has become a boastful receiver of some “gigantic” improvements in processing power – and it’s not only that.

In the HTC One review, we have witnessed one of the most powerful smartphones we’ve ever used – and as it uses the same chipset running at higher frequency, Galaxy S 4 belongs to the same class. In general, GS4 runs amazingly well, but there’s one thing that need to notify ahead: when Air View and Air Gestures are activated, we realize the phone acts a little slow even in the most basic tasks. It will always fulfill these, but we’re unable to notice some stutters. this seems to show that the features of Sammy gobbles the processor and stays deactivated unless you use them regularly (that is not sure to happen). In terms of game, Adreno 320 excels here as it used to on One; in the GLBenchmark test which ranks GS4 higher, you can’t be able to see the big difference when playing the games heavy in graphics such as Riptide or Asphalt 7.

Samsung has increased the battery capacity to 2,600mAh (from 2,100mAh on GS3), but its more complex components (higher-res screen, better camera and more powerful processor) normally chew up more energy. We’re not surprised to see the battery life measured by our battery test (video repeating at 50% brightness and other standard settings) is only a little better. In brief, it’s run through a complete cycle in 9 hours and 15 minutes. If we’re comparing the T-Mobile versions, this means that GS4 beats GS3 for 17 minutes. It’s higher than the average level for a premium phone at the beginning of 2013; as we have a habit to compare the pride of HTC, One reaches 6 hours and a half in the same test. To be honest, we can’t check GS4 in a LTE area, though the phone has full HSPA+ signal. About practical use, we normally have 14 or 15 hours of regular use before we need to charge. This means that the skilled users can go through a whole working day with a little battery remained for the train to get back home, and most of the others may use until they’re about to go to bed before the battery is low.

Samsung has increased the battery capacity to 2,600mAh (from 2,100mAh on GS3), but its more complex components (higher-res screen, better camera and more powerful processor) normally chew up more energy.

Samsung has increased the battery capacity to 2,600mAh (from 2,100mAh on GS3), but its more complex components (higher-res screen, better camera and more powerful processor) normally chew up more energy.

We use GS4 to make calls, the volume is loud, though it’s slightly smaller than One and iPhone 5. We can hear a person from another side clear, and it turns out that they don’t know that we’re walking on a pretty crowded street thanks to the noise-disposal ability. The used speaker phone is bigger than GS3, but it’s not as big as the BoomSound stereo speakers of One.

We use GS4 to make calls, the volume is loud, though it’s slightly smaller than One and iPhone 5.

We use GS4 to make calls, the volume is loud, though it’s slightly smaller than One and iPhone 5.

When the device has several versions, it’s hard to define the network performance, at least for a testing model. Samsung provides 6 groups of possible radio frequency, so it’s the rights of each carrier to define which works the best for their network. For example, T-Mobile and AT&T all have 4-band LTE (band 2, 4, 5 and 17) and 4-band GSM/EDGE, but T-Mobile offers 850/AWS/1,900, 2,100 DC-HSPA+ 42Mbps while HSPA+ band of AT&T covers 850/1,900/2,100. (Besides, T-Mobile has confirmed to us that its LTE antenna works with 5-20MHz band). Verizon and Sprint all use 850/1,900 CDMA/EVDO as well as 850/1,900 GSM/EDGE/UMTS/HSPA+, thought the option of Big Red provides LTE in band 4 and 13 (700/AWS) while Sprint uses band 25 (1,900). Now Network use removable SIM and will open international GSM roaming after 90 first days of the services; we hope that Verizon provides the international roaming, but we haven’t received the confirmation. The common international models, I9505 running Snapdragon 600 and I9500 running Exynos, provide 4-band GSM/EDGE, 4-band HSPA+ (850/900/1,900/,2100) and the maximum of 6 LTE bands. All of them offer different data performance depending on the specific model you use, though our T-Mobile model has the speed which is equal to GS3 and other high-end phones which are currently using the same network.

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